Lift off?

Today I managed to complete the wiring and get the engine started. I’ll let you read further in the Done section to get the gist of my troubles.

I’m dissapointed that the car is not mobile, as I promised my son Hamish that he could drive it to a car event tomorrow.

As Malcolm Fraser once said “Life wasn’t meant to be easy”.

Done

  • Completed all the sensor wiring and Mini electrics.
  • Tested Mini electrics, lights indicators etc.
  • Tested MegaSquirt connectivity to all sensors and peripherals e.g. fuel pump, radiator fan…
  • Adjusted VR sensor to get it to trigger properly. Discovered it was out of phase, so adjusted the “Ignition Input Capture” value from “Rising edge” to “Falling Edge”. I used the TunerStudio “Tooth Logger” which showed two long bars instead of one long bar when it passed the missing tooth. This indicated that the phase was out. I also adjusted the position, of the VR sensor a little further away from the trigger wheel.
  • Checked and tried to adjust the fuel pump pressure using the FP test O/P in TunerStudio and the Fuel regulator. Fuel pump was making a right racket, much louder than the original SPI pump, and the return hose in the boot (trunk) was banging back and forth. I haven’t fully come to a conclusion, but I think the pump (a MPI/SPI replacement from Mini Spares) is a 255L/Hr 3Bar whereas the original OEM SPI pump I replaced was a 1Bar unit, flow rate unknown, but obviously less.
    I ultimately adjusted the regulator to ~ 12PSI, the gauge in TS was jumping around a bit… maybe +- 0.75PSI or more. Never had this problem with the original pump! My theory is that setting it to 12PSI which is 30PSI or so less than the MPI setting, the flow rate is overpowering the FP regulator causing it to fluctuate.
    I wired up the Main and FP SSR’s using the DIYAutotune wiring diagram. This allows the FP to be used both as in a ON/OFF and PWM mode without any wiring changes. So I might try bypassing the FP regulator and use  the ‘T’ piece with the FP pressure sensor, I have nothing to loose, and this was my original intent to use PWM to effect a returnless fuel system.
    Any ideas folks?
  • Noticed the Knock Sensor gauge was running around 60% when car was idling (surging more like it). I will turn this off until I get a stable idle and tune. Good to know though that it’s sensing something!
  • Started engine and got it to run sort of. It was running lean and hunting, pretty badly.
    I’ve abandoned trying to get it to idle, until I get the FP sorted. One interesting thing I tried to get it to run better was to change the injector flow rate from 622cc/min @ 12PSI to 400cc/min which equates to running the injector @ 5PSI. This richened it up a bit, but still had hunting. I’m confused; the injector is a brand new one, but could they have supplied an incorrect or badly flowing one?

    My Air Fuel and Volumetric Efficiency tables are pretty much as per my original tune, so why the lean running?

Eddie my dog, in his usual repose!
Eddie my best mate, in his usual repose!

To Do

  • Find a solution for fuel pump pressure regulation (maybe PWM) and flow.
  • Test injector flow rate, and check P/No is correct.
  • Test and set-up PWM for radiator fan control
  • Check timing and adjust the index position using TunerStudio to give the base timing value.
  • Adjust VE table to get it running OK
  • Take it for a drive to dial in VE table using TunerStudio’s VEAL.
  • Use and enjoy it!

Nice to do, but not required!

  • Fit the new heater. (Not doing until I have car on the road and tuned in… it is summer after all!)
  • Get a wheel balance and alignment.

If you would like to leave a comment (please do) , click the Leave a Reply link below.

More Progress – Is that a light I can see?

An update on the progress made today. Not a lot done today, ran out of enthusiasm and steam. Sorry no pictures today.

Today’s effort is marked as  ‘Day 11‘.

If you would like to leave a comment (please do) , please click the Leave a Reply link above.

  • Remove existing MegaSquirt relay board, and existing wiring for EFI sensors.
    Day 1  – done.
  • Fit EFI fuel filter under the car and connect hoses.
    Day 1 – done.
    Day 2 – removed and painted the filter housing as it was crappy.
    Day 4 – refitted all done.
    Day 10 – Connect up return line (5/16″) and outlet (1/4″) Done.
  • Remove standard engine driven fuel pump and fit blanking plate.
    Day 10 – Found that I had a possible oil leak from here. Looks like I never used a gasket but used sealant of some kind that the oil has attacked. I’ve made a proper gasket and used sealant, so hopefully fixed. Done.
  • Fit new 30PSI fuel pressure sensor (for PWM control of fuel pressure).
    Day 3 – sort of done.
    Day 6 – fitted barbs and 30PSI sensor using Loctite 567 Thread Sealant.
    Day 10 – removed sensor and fitted it to the original Aeromotive fuel pressure regulator. This was done because I’m not going with the PWM Returnless  fuel regulation as outlined in this post.
  • Fit new injector to throttle body.
  • Day 1 – done.
    Day 2 – removed it to make sure bottom ‘O’ ring was sealing, had problems with this in the past causing erratic fuelling as it was dribbling all the time. I’ll perform a leak test when I get fuel pressure up.
  • Fit new solid state relays (SSR) for PWM control of injection fuel pump and radiator electric fan.
    Day 8 – found location above fuel sensor ‘T’ piece, haven’t fixed them yet.
  • Clean and paint corner of bulkhead where brake fluid has removed paint and caused surface rust.
    Day 2 – have obtained correct ‘Indigo’ blue paint in a can.
    Day 5 – removed Brake master cylinder so as to gain access to damaged paint. Wire wheeled and sanded area and treated it to rust converter.
    Day 6 – seam sealed, primed, sanded and top coated with Indigo blue acrylic paint. Done.
  • Finish fitting new Bluetooth radio.
    Day 1 – done.
    Day 2 – played many tunes on it today!
  • Fit new relay and fuse block,
    Day 6 – will locate fuse/relay block over the black plate in above picture using alloy spacers so as to allow access for wiring loom. I will also be getting rid of the original 2 fuse (35A each!) block and using individual circuit fuses along with relays for some of the high current items e.g. lights etc.
    Wiring loom will come through firewall near black  plate using 1 or 2 cable glands. I’m not sure yet on number, my thoughts being to separate high current/noisy wires from the low current and analogue signals. Will it make any difference?
    Day 9 – Fitted the combined fuse relay box to bulkhead, used two 8mm cap head screws and made some spacers out of aluminium round stock to space it sufficiently for underneath cable access.
    Day 10 – Decided to use a new Lucas two fuse block for the cars main fuses, except for the EFI side of things, which I will use a 6 fuse common rail fuse holder and 2 standard speed SSR’s, 1 for the Main relay, the other for the Petrol pump. One high speed (max 3500Hz) Croydom relay is spare at this stage, but hopefully will be pressed into use as the petrol pump PWM relay. The other high speed one is for PWM of the radiator pump controlled by the Generic PWM A setting.
    I’ve mounted the panel to the car now, ready for wiring. Done
  • Wire new EFI harnesses to relay/fuse blocks and to sensors
    Day 7 Created new wiring harness for the two D-Sub 37 pin ECU connectors. I used two pre-made cables that I obtained from DIYAutoTune previously. I removed all of the wires from the MS3 connector not relevant to my installation using an extractor tool, but for some reason the tool would not remove the pins from the MS3X connector. So I cut the unneeded wires on this connector a few inches  away, so that if I need them in the future I can join them up easily.
    I used the following self-closing braided wire wrap as I believe it offers superior protection and functionality to the loom tubing as originally supplied by DIYAutoTune. It comes in various sizes as well as fully enclosed and split versions
    All of the wires I will feed through a bulkhead cable gland and then to the end destination.
    Day 10 – Fitted the cable gland to very bottom corner of bulkhead, Used a step drill and then a Dremel with a carbide bit to take the hole out to 28mm. Was a tight fit, but everything fitted!
    Quarter done on looming the existing and EFI wiring, hopefully will finish tomorrow. Said that before haven’t I. LOL
    Day 11 – Continued wiring, did the 10 earth returns and the knock sensor. I’ve loomed it so that all analogue and low voltage signals are as far away from high current wires to minimise noise.
  • Sort and clean existing cars wiring loom. Combine EFI wires to this loom and re-loom using better quality loom tubing.
    Day 9 – Removed insulation tape from existing car loom and identified wires that need re-terminating. What a mess I found!
    A tip for anyone else tidying their loom, you can use acetone on a rag to wipe each cable clean, just keep it well away from your cars duco!Done
  • Fit MS to bottom of dash rail using nut inserts (more secure).Day 6 – have looked into this,  and will use 3 4mm allen cap head screws into 3 4mm nut inserts into dash panel tray on right side of car. Can only fit 3 fastners, as there is a great big hole where the right one would go, plus the screw head is partly obscured by the DB37 connectors.
  • Test and set-up PWM for radiator fan control
  • Need to adjust tappets, as I have re-torqued the cylinder head.
  • Fit new windscreen washer bag to hang under the R/H fender and connect it up.
    Day 8 – Used two bolts and wing nuts to hold it on to the inside of the engine bay. There seems to be enough room to fit it and the forthcoming MAF sensor and its air filter etc. Done.
  • Relocate power brake booster backwards by ~ 2″ to allow for a cold air/filter box to feed the MAF sensor that will be fitted at a later date.
    Day 2 – removed, waiting for me to make new 3/16″ pipes and new brackets.
    Day 5 – not happy with the VH44 brake booster, so have ordered a MK3 Cooper ‘S’ booster, should be here by the end of the week.
    Day 6 – booster has arrived along with new brake master cylinder.
  • Replace the Cooper ‘S’ discs and pads.
    Day 4 – removed discs and ultrasonic cleaned callipers.
  • Fit 1 Bosch knock sensor to the engine steady bracket bolt near cylinder number 4. Anecdotal evidence is that number 4 cylinder runs the hottest and leanest in the ‘A’ series engine, so this location is the closest I can get the sensor to the cylinder without drilling and tapping a hole in the block. Bonus also is it’s the furthest away from the timing chain, water pump etc.
    Day 8 – done.
  • Install a common earthing bar for the MegaSquirt ECU analogue earths. This is required to be connected on the engine as closes as possible (electrically) so as to minimise earth loops and voltage offsets.
    I used a brass earthing bar which I have connected to two unused bolt holes on the aluminium clutch bellhousing. I used some copper grease on the holes/bolts for corrosion resistance. I connected a ring terminal to a nearby bolt and the other end I terminated using a blue crimp ferrule. I always if I can solder my crimps. Done
  • Replace with new and paint both L/H & R/H top suspension arms.
    Day 1 – 1 done.
    Day 2 – done.
  • Replace rear competition bump stops with standard bump stops.
    Day 1 – done.
  • Check rear wheel brake cylinders for leaks and also that they are 5/8″ bore.
    Day 1 – found one cylinder seized, replaced both sides, as well as brake shoe springs and adjusters.
    Day 10 – Both rear brake slave cylinder had seized pistons from sitting unused so have replaced along with new return springs, brake adjusters and new braided hoses. The shoes were in good condition along with the drums, so were just given a sand to help them bed back in. Along with the new hoses and overhauled front callipers and new booster, the whole braking system is new.
    Note: If you want to avoid a mental breakdown, do yourself a favour, and get the special tool to help you install the slave cylinder’s retaining C clip to the back.I also masked of the drum  and painted it with black calliper paint. Done.
  • Fit new front brake hoses.
    Day 1 – 1/2 done.
    Day 5 – removed R/H/F hose… what a PITA that was… Hamish swore at me and said I should get an American car as they are easier to work on!
  • Fit the new heater.
    Day 2 – bench tested to make sure it works… it does
  • Fit the new boot brackets and make a boot board to fit on top of these brackets.
    Day 2 – bought marine ply and carpet to make it. Also trial fitted brackets.
    Day 4 – brackets painted car colour (indigo) and made cardboard pattern of required boot board size and transferred this to 12mm ply and cut-out with jigsaw. Fits like a finger up a b**.
  • Get wheel balance and alignment
  • Day 2 – fitted new roof mount aerial… what a PITA! Done.
  • Day 2 – continued to feed my ultrasonic cleaner various greasy/dirty bits… ongoing Done
  • Day 4 – fitted new black accelerator cable, so as to get rid of crappy yellow one Done
  • Day 4 – I couldn’t sell the NGK spark plug leads so I obtained some genuine NGK 90 degree plug ends and fitted them  to the shortened NGK leads. Looks a lot better as leads are closer to engine. Done.
    Day 5 – obtained new BPR6ES NGK plugs and fitted them. Done.
  • Day 5 – discovered that brake master cylinder was a little weepy, they cost so little, so I ordered a new one instead of fitting a kit.
    Day 6 – fitted new brake master cylinder. Need to do the pivot pin and its split pin though!
    Day 10 –  Now fitted including the pesky clevis pin! Done.
  • Day 6 – painted one of the front disk callipers a nice bright red… I used old pistons, top seals, inlet pipe and a set bolt to fill/cover all important openings from the paint.
  • Day 10 – Have decide I don’t like the colour of the red, and it’s to out there for my liking, so I’ll either remove the paint using paint stripper or I’ll just paint over it with black calliper paint.
    Day 11 – Removed the paint on the callipers, using paint stripper. Next step is to wire brush to remove any remnants and paint three or more light coats of black calliper paint.
  • Day 11 – Had a thought at the back of my mind about the ROH Contessa magnesium wheel nuts. Had a issue where they were found loose, but inspections of the wheel studs showed wisps of thread on them. Long story short is the tyre fitters had used their brute force rattle guns to tighten the nuts, and in the process have started to strip the threads.
    So I ordered 16 new ones from Mini Kingdom Online… hopefully I’ll have no more issues.
  • Day 11 – Degreased all 4 wheels and blasted them with my high pressure water cleaner… they look good now.

More Progress – Light at the end of the tunnel

An update on the progress made in the last couple days,

Today’s effort is marked as  ‘Day 10‘.

If you would like to leave a comment (please do) , please click the Leave a Reply link above.

  • Remove existing MegaSquirt relay board, and existing wiring for EFI sensors.
    Day 1  – done.
  • Fit EFI fuel filter under the car and connect hoses.
    Day 1 – done.
    Day 2 – removed and painted the filter housing as it was crappy.
    Day 4 – refitted all done.
    Day 10 – Connect up return line (5/16″) and outlet (1/4″) Done.
  • Remove standard engine driven fuel pump and fit blanking plate.
    Day 10 – Found that I had a possible oil leak from here. Looks like I never used a gasket but used sealant of some kind that the oil has attacked. I’ve made a proper gasket and used sealant, so hopefully fixed. Done.
  • Fit new 30PSI fuel pressure sensor (for PWM control of fuel pressure).
    Day 3 – sort of done.
    Day 6 – fitted barbs and 30PSI sensor using Loctite 567 Thread Sealant.
    Day 10 – removed sensor and fitted it to the original Aeromotive fuel pressure regulator. This was done because I’m not going with the PWM Returnless  fuel regulation as outlined in this post.

    Fuel regulator withe 30PSI sensor ftted
    Fuel regulator with the 30PSI sensor fitted

     

  • Fit new injector to throttle body.
  • Day 1 – done.
    Day 2 – removed it to make sure bottom ‘O’ ring was sealing, had problems with this in the past causing erratic fuelling as it was dribbling all the time. I’ll perform a leak test when I get fuel pressure up.
  • Fit new solid state relays (SSR) for PWM control of injection fuel pump and radiator electric fan.
    Day 8 – found location above fuel sensor ‘T’ piece, haven’t fixed them yet.
  • Clean and paint corner of bulkhead where brake fluid has removed paint and caused surface rust.
    Day 2 – have obtained correct ‘Indigo’ blue paint in a can.
    Day 5 – removed Brake master cylinder so as to gain access to damaged paint. Wire wheeled and sanded area and treated it to rust converter.
    Day 6 – seam sealed, primed, sanded and top coated with Indigo blue acrylic paint. Done.
  • Finish fitting new Bluetooth radio.
    Day 1 – done.
    Day 2 – played many tunes on it today!
  • Fit new relay and fuse block,
    Day 6 – will locate fuse/relay block over the black plate in above picture using alloy spacers so as to allow access for wiring loom. I will also be getting rid of the original 2 fuse (35A each!) block and using individual circuit fuses along with relays for some of the high current items e.g. lights etc.
    Wiring loom will come through firewall near black  plate using 1 or 2 cable glands. I’m not sure yet on number, my thoughts being to separate high current/noisy wires from the low current and analogue signals. Will it make any difference?
    Day 9 – Fitted the combined fuse relay box to bulkhead, used two 8mm cap head screws and made some spacers out of aluminium round stock to space it sufficiently for underneath cable access.
    Day 10 – Decided to use a new Lucas two fuse block for the cars main fuses, except for the EFI side of things, which I will use a 6 fuse common rail fuse holder and 2 standard speed SSR’s, 1 for the Main relay, the other for the Petrol pump. One high speed (max 3500 Hz) Croydom relay is spare at this stage, but hopefully will be pressed into use as the petrol pump PWM relay. The other high speed one is for PWM of the radiator pump controlled by the Generic PWM A setting.
    I’ve mounted the panel to the car now, ready for wiring. Done

    Relay Panel
    Relay Panel
    Relay fuse panel
    Relay fuse panel

     

  • Wire new EFI harnesses to relay/fuse blocks and to sensors
    Day 7 Created new wiring harness for the two D-Sub 37 pin ECU connectors. I used two pre-made cables that I obtained from DIYAutoTune previously. I removed all of the wires from the MS3 connector not relevant to my installation using an extractor tool, but for some reason the tool would not remove the pins from the MS3X connector. So I cut the unneeded wires on this connector a few inches  away, so that if I need them in the future I can join them up easily.
    I used the following self-closing braided wire wrap as I believe it offers superior protection and functionality to the loom tubing as originally supplied by DIYAutoTune. It comes in various sizes as well as fully enclosed and split versions
    All of the wires I will feed through a bulkhead cable gland and then to the end destination.
    Day 10 – Fitted the cable gland to very bottom corner of bulkhead, Used a step drill and then a Dremel with a carbide bit to take the hole out to 28mm. Was a tight fit, but everything fitted!

    Cable gland
    Cable gland. Two rivnuts hold the relay/fuse panel in.

     

    DB37 connectors hanging under the dash shelf.
    DB37 connectors hanging under the dash shelf.

    Quarter done on looming the existing and EFI wiring, hopefully will finish tomorrow. Said that before haven’t I. LOL

  • Sort and clean existing cars wiring loom. Combine EFI wires to this loom and re-loom using better quality loom tubing.
    Day 9 – Removed insulation tape from existing car loom and identified wires that need re-terminating. What a mess I found!
    A tip for anyone else tidying their loom, you can use acetone on a rag to wipe each cable clean, just keep it well away from your cars duco!Done
  • Fit MS to bottom of dash rail using nut inserts (more secure).Day 6 – have looked into this,  and will use 3 4mm allen cap head screws into 3 4mm nut inserts into dash panel tray on right side of car. Can only fit 3 fastners, as there is a great big hole where the right one would go, plus the screw head is partly obscured by the DB37 connectors.
  • Test and set-up PWM for radiator fan control
  • Need to adjust tappets, as I have re-torqued the cylinder head.
  • Fit new windscreen washer bag to hang under the R/H fender and connect it up.
    Day 8 – Used two bolts and wing nuts to hold it on to the inside of the engine bay. There seems to be enough room to fit it and the forthcoming MAF sensor and its air filter etc. Done.
  • Relocate power brake booster backwards by ~ 2″ to allow for a cold air/filter box to feed the MAF sensor that will be fitted at a later date.
    Day 2 – removed, waiting for me to make new 3/16″ pipes and new brackets.
    Day 5 – not happy with the VH44 brake booster, so have ordered a MK3 Cooper ‘S’ booster, should be here by the end of the week.
    Day 6 – booster has arrived along with new brake master cylinder.
  • Replace the Cooper ‘S’ discs and pads.
    Day 4 – removed discs and ultrasonic cleaned callipers.
  • Fit 1 Bosch knock sensor to the engine steady bracket bolt near cylinder number 4. Anecdotal evidence is that number 4 cylinder runs the hottest and leanest in the ‘A’ series engine, so this location is the closest I can get the sensor to the cylinder without drilling and tapping a hole in the block. Bonus also is it’s the furthest away from the timing chain, water pump etc.
    Day 8 – done.
  • Install a common earthing bar for the MegaSquirt ECU analogue earths. This is required to be connected on the engine as closes as possible (electrically) so as to minimise earth loops and voltage offsets.
    I used a brass earthing bar which I have connected to two unused bolt holes on the aluminium clutch bellhousing. I used some copper grease on the holes/bolts for corrosion resistance. I connected a ring terminal to a nearby bolt and the other end I terminated using a blue crimp ferrule. I always if I can solder my crimps. Done
  • Replace with new and paint both L/H & R/H top suspension arms.
    Day 1 – 1 done.
    Day 2 – done.
  • Replace rear competition bump stops with standard bump stops.
    Day 1 – done.
  • Check rear wheel brake cylinders for leaks and also that they are 5/8″ bore.
    Day 1 – found one cylinder seized, replaced both sides, as well as brake shoe springs and adjusters.
    Day 10 – Both rear brake slave cylinder had seized pistons from sitting unused so have replaced along with new return springs, brake adjusters and new braided hoses. The shoes were in good condition along with the drums, so were just given a sand to help them bed back in. Along with the new hoses and overhauled front callipers and new booster, the whole braking system is new.
    Note: If you want to avoid a mental breakdown, do yourself a favour, and get the special tool to help you install the slave cylinder’s retaining C clip to the back.

    C clip inserting tool
    C clip inserting tool

    I also masked of the drum  and painted it with black calliper paint. Done.

    Drum after wire brushing
    Drum after wire brushing
    Drum after rust converter applied
    Drum after rust converter applied
    Masked and ready for paint
    Masked and ready for paint
    Painted!
    Painted! Looking good!

     

  • Fit new front brake hoses.
    Day 1 – 1/2 done.
    Day 5 – removed R/H/F hose… what a PITA that was… Hamish swore at me and said I should get an American car as they are easier to work on!
  • Fit the new heater.
    Day 2 – bench tested to make sure it works… it does
  • Fit the new boot brackets and make a boot board to fit on top of these brackets.
    Day 2 – bought marine ply and carpet to make it. Also trial fitted brackets.
    Day 4 – brackets painted car colour (indigo) and made cardboard pattern of required boot board size and transferred this to 12mm ply and cut-out with jigsaw. Fits like a finger up a b**.
  • Get wheel balance and alignment
  • Day 2 – fitted new roof mount aerial… what a PITA! Done.
  • Day 2 – continued to feed my ultrasonic cleaner various greasy/dirty bits… ongoing Done
  • Day 4 – fitted new black accelerator cable, so as to get rid of crappy yellow one Done
  • Day 4 – I couldn’t sell the NGK spark plug leads so I obtained some genuine NGK 90 degree plug ends and fitted them  to the shortened NGK leads. Looks a lot better as leads are closer to engine. Done.
    Day 5 – obtained new BPR6ES NGK plugs and fitted them. Done.
  • Day 5 – discovered that brake master cylinder was a little weepy, they cost so little, so I ordered a new one instead of fitting a kit.
    Day 6 – fitted new brake master cylinder. Need to do the pivot pin and its split pin though!
    Day 10 –  Now fitted including the pesky clevis pin! Done.
  • Day 6 – painted one of the front disk callipers a nice bright red… I used old pistons, top seals, inlet pipe and a set bolt to fill/cover all important openings from the paint.
  • Day 10 – Have decide I don’t like the colour of the red, and it’s to out there for my liking, so I’ll either remove the paint using paint stripper or I’ll just paint over it with black calliper paint.

Update on PWM Motor Controller

I finally got around to committing my modified design to a homemade PCB. When I say modified I had to change the design to incorporate a 5V voltage source for the TC4428 Mosfet driver chip because if I used the the cars 12V (which can go higher than 13.8V) this was higher than the BUK953R5-60 Mosfet’s maxium Voltage Gate to Source VGS allowed. This is specified at  15V max for pulsed and 10V max for DC. So as you can see it would be very close when being pulsed i.e. PWM and over when at DC by a significant margin.

My original comments on the need for a pull down resistor on the PWM input turned out to be true. The TC4428 outputs were jumping all over the place if the input PWM input was left floating. I’ve now included a resistor in the circuit diagram.

Sorry if it sounds all techo, but I didn’t want it to fail on me… or anyone else also!

Anyway I’m not happy with the circuit… so since I’m trying to get my car back on the road I have gone back to plan ‘A’ i.e. using a SSR.

I have ordered two CRYDOM D1D20 SSR that are specified to work up to 3500Hz in a PWM application (less than 100uS turn on time). But boy are they expensive, well at least here in Australia.

I’ll post my findings when I get them… I should have ordered 3 though as I think I have decided to also ditch the water pump and use a Electric Water Pump (EWP) to tame the cooling further… more money needed.

PWM Motor Controller

I’ve haven’t been well for a couple of weeks with recurring sinusitis. Consequentially work on the Mini has dragged to a halt… well nearly. I’ve created a PCB for the controller and I’ll let the pretty pictures tell the story.

PCB Layout Single Sided
PCB Layout Single Sided

 

3D Top
3D Top
3D Bottom
3D Bottom

I’ll etch up a few copies of the board next week hopefully when I have three days off from work. By the way the layout and 3D I did in Kicad, first PCB I’ve done since the early 90’s.

Edit: 8th Mar 2015

Changed board to have larger holes and pads for high current stuff, also added Bi-colour LED facility (to give it some bling!) Updated all pictures to reflect changes.

Edit: 17th Mar 2015

Sometimes it pays to re-read what you have posted! For further clarity, the Red/Green LED will be glowing red when 0% PWM is happening, and then will progressively go through orange to green when 100% PWM.

I’ll be making the PCB’s tomorrow… so stay tuned.